North Staffs Carers now have a defibrillator on the outside of their building thanks to a very kind donation from a former carer Phil Brown. The defibrillator was donated in memory of Phil’s wife Alison

The machine is  available 24/7 and registered on the ambulance service database, anyone needing access to the defib should call 999 in the first instance and follow instructions from the call handler.

Members of North Staffs Carers and the local community also attended a defibrillator awareness session.

A defibrillator is a device that gives a high-energy electric shock to the heart through the chest wall to someone who is in cardiac arrest.

A cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time and following the four steps in the chain of survival can help to increase the patient chances of survival.

Call 999
Commence CPR
Early Defibrillation
Early Advanced Life Support

Defibrillators are easy to use and come with either verbal or visual step by step instructions. The machines are designed to be used by anyone with or without prior training. Anyone needing a defibrillator should call 999 in the first instance and the call handler will advise where the nearest one is and how to access it. If effective CPR and a defibrillator can be applied within the first 3-5 minutes of collapse the chances of survival for the victim can increase from 6%-74%. Without immediate treatment, 90%-95% of patients will die.

Join our Staffs 1000 campaign 

On 1st May 2019, we launched a brand new campaign, with a mission to install 1,000 Community Access Defibrillators across Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent.

We work closely with local communities, residents’ associations, businesses, and councils to fundraise, purchase, install and register defibrillators that are public access. The charity works pan-UK and raises awareness, knowledge, and confidence in the safe use of defibrillators and CPR.

In Staffordshire, the average time for emergency services to arrive following a 999 call is 8-12 minutes. In the case of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), every minute counts, the person’s survival rate drops by 7-10% for every minute defibrillation (and CPR) is delayed.

During this time, the person’s survival depends on bystanders who initiate CPR and defibrillation from an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Defibrillation within 3-5 minutes of collapse can produce survival rates as high as 50-70%. This means with more public access defibrillators; we could significantly improve survival rates. https://www.aeddonate.org.uk/staffordshire-1000/